Call for Submissions: Aesthesis

 

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Aesthesis invites LAHP-funded doctoral candidates to submit artworks that creatively reinterpret their PhD thesis in a non-textual form.

 Submissions can take any form that can be displayed in a gallery space – be it painting, sculpture, digital image, photograph, film, recorded theatre or dance performance, sound recording, installation, &c. Entries should be accompanied by a short description (200-300 words) on the author’s research, and how the artwork reinterprets or relates to it. The artwork could be related to the content or methodology of the PhD, or related ideas and practices more broadly construed.

 Submitted projects will be showcased in an exhibition at the end of the summer term 2015. A panel of judges will award prizes (for example Tate membership and National Art Pass) to the winning entry and runners up.

 The project aims to explore the ways that the complexity of doctoral theses can be captured in forms that are not straightforwardly textual. We hope to encourage LAHP students to think about their projects in radically different ways, consider their ideas in a fresh light, and explore how to capture the minds of a non-specialist public, as well as create beautiful artworks.

 If you’re interested in taking part or have any questions, please get in touch:

aesthesis.lahp@gmail.com.

Deadline for submissions is 15 May 2015.

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The Passing Present

The Passing Present, Oil on linen, 45 x 35cm, 2014

The Passing Present, Oil on linen, 45 x 35 cm, 2014

© Nathan Jones Art

In common with my current practice, The Passing Present suggests a fluid boundary between the real and the unreal.  Ultimately, there is little that can be said with certainty about this painting: the subject is neither flesh nor stone, it floats without body, location or purpose, and there is no validating narrative to offer a foothold for interpretation.  This mutability and ambiguity is further suggested by the fluid paint handling, which implies a movement that is at odds with the subject’s stillness.  The paint itself, at points thin, delicate and descriptive, occasionally ruptures into rough, impasto abstraction – a painterly language that is thoroughly hostile to a singular version of reality.  Although it is offset by contrasting flares of warmth, the palette is dominated by an otherworldly blue – this further removes the figure from our present moment.  As the title implies, the painting draws attention to the passing of time, while also blurring boundaries between the past and the present.

Nathan Jones is a London artist, practice-based researcher and, formerly, a postgraduate student at University of the Arts London.  For full works and details of his practice, see www.nathanjonesart.co.uk