Footnotes on Digital Selves

In a special edition of Footnotes on KCL Radio broadcast live on the 27 July 9-10am, hosts Fran and Char invited PhD researchers to take on the theme of The Still Point‘s first blog symposium: Digital Selves in Research.

From online facsimiles of manuscripts to social media profiles, PhD students from across King’s College London explore how they work with, analyse and are shaped by the digital. Thank you to Colleen Curran, palaeographer and historian; Anna Khlusova from Cultural and Creative Industries; and Rachael Kent, whose PhD spans the Digital Humanities and CCI as a member of the Ego-Media project.

The Still Point Journal‘s blog editor, James Fisher, also joined the panel to discuss all things ‘real’ vs ‘virtual’.

Links:
Colleen Curran https://twitter.com/cmcurran21
Anna Khlusova https://twitter.com/annakhlus
Rachael Kent https://twitter.com/RachaelCKent
European Research Council Ego-Media project https://www.ego-media.org

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#DigitalSelves Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon: Friday 29 July

Join the conversation @stillpointLDN   //   #DigitalSelves   //   Join our Facebook event

As part of our inaugural online symposium Digital Selves in Research, we’re hosting a Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon at the beautiful Maughan Library, Chancery Lane, from 3-5:45pm on Friday 29 July.

Inspired by previous ‘Wikithons’ from around the world – including Art+Feminism‘s annual global event, which last year added a staggering 334 pages for women artists – we will be getting together to create or improve Wikipedia articles on the subjects closest to our hearts: from medieval sci-fi to Victorian agriculture to contemporary beat poetry.

Why are we embarking on such a project? Simply put, we love to share our research, and Wikipedia is the ultimate open-access journal. Quite often, our research pays loving attention to under-studied subjects, people, stories, and places: whether they are women, people of colour, from outside of Western Europe or the US. We might also be making ‘new’ discoveries: names, dates, works of literature or art that have been hidden away, uncatalogued and invisible in plain sight in archives, libraries, or homes. And, let’s be honest, Wikipedia is still a point of call for many of us when a key date or name has popped out of our heads – so why not use it like our own researcher’s notebook?

The Maughan Library will be a great base, with access to online and real life journals, books, and a music and DVD collection. We will also have some snack supplies to keep us going! Best of all, post editing we’ll all relocate to Ye Olde Cock Tavern, 22 Fleet St, London EC4Y 1AA, for the symposium after-party 6-8pm.

Take part in the #DigitalSelves Edit-a-thon: in person

Everyone is welcome to drop in any time between 3-5:30pm at the Maughan Library but please note: if you are a student or researcher at any of these institutions, you must bring your ID card.

If you are NOT registered at an institution on the list, just drop us an email with your full name, contact details, and what time you’ll be arriving to blog[at]thestillpointjournal[dot]com.

Editing Wikipedia is simple, and members of the blog team will be on hand to help. You don’t have to do any planning before the session, although it would save some time if you scope out which pages you’re interested in that might need a little TLC, what books and journals are available in the King’s library catalogue, and if you can register on Wikipedia before you arrive.

Take part in the #DigitalSelves Edit-a-thon: wherever you are!

Can’t make it to the Maughan? Wherever you are (out of London, or out of the UK!) you are very welcome to join the edit-a-thon virtually. We will be twittering and facebooking our progress and we would love to hear from far-flung participants. Remember we’re on British Summer Time, 3-5:30pm.

Whether you’re planning on taking part at the Maughan or from wherever you are in the world, we’d love to hear your plans and progress. Whether you make just a tiny reference edit, or end up creating an encyclopedic series of new pages, we want to keep track of all the knowledge shared on the 29 July.

Tweet us @stillpointldn or use the tag #DigitalSelves. You can also join our Facebook event. Even simpler, comment below.

Get the details in your diaries, start gathering your ideas, and we can’t wait to meet you and your Wikipedia pet projects.

#DigitalSelves Wikipedia Edit-a-Thon: meet up for researchers to edit Wikipedia pages together @ The Maughan Library, Chancery Lane, London WC2A 1LR.

Find out what else is going on, see our full symposium programme.

For the uninitiated, here’s Wikipedia’s own wiki on how to get started with editing (yes, it’s a wiki about a wiki), or take a look at the video below.

Poetry of Place: an interview with ourselves

Poetry of Place took place on 17th May at Enitharmon Press in Bloomsbury. The event brought three poets into conversation about how place and poetry intersects in their work. Fran and I had met for the first time in March, after answering a call put out by the London Arts and Humanities Partnership for two PhD students to run a poetry event. We had a couple of months to get to know each other, plan, meet the poets, and figure out how to bring our own research interests into dialogue, and with the poetry. A real challenge, not least because we’re from very different disciplines  – or so we thought!

Right! I’m studying for a PhD based in the English department at KCL, situated between Old English and Performance studies. My research looks at Sutton Hoo, a seventh century medieval burial ground, and Old English poetry. I’m interested in how poetry and place come together at this site to (re)create history. I’m very much picking up on medievalists Gillian Overing and Marijane Osborn’s ‘conviction – or fiction – of the past as being located through or as place’ (Overing and Osborn, 1989).

Whilst I’m at UCL working across the fields of Architectural History & Theory, and Music, looking at the work of  the architect and composer Iannis Xenakis.    Continue reading